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Incident Response

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Incident Response

It is imperative to have a process in place to handle incidents that could affect your organizations data or infrastructure.  Spending time and resources to protect your companies confidential data is a must.  It is imperative to have a plan in place to handle any situations that may arise.  Responding to and isolating incidents quickly should take high priority to reduce damages and/or data loss in the event of a breach.  In addition to having a legal and moral responsibility of having procedures to protect sensitive information about customers, employees and others, you also have a legal responsibility to report, to any individual, if there is a chance that there personal information may have been exposed because of a breach in your network.  DTI Data cannot only help you with responding to an incident, but our specialists can also assist you in developing policy and procedures to make sure you have a well-documented plan in place prior to an event occurring.  Data breaches occur on daily basis all over the world at a pace that most people would find unbelievable.

A data breach as an incident in which sensitive, protected, or confidential data has potentially been viewed, stolen, or used by an unauthorized individual. Data breaches can involve payment card information (PCI), personal health information (PHI), personally identifiable information (PII), trade secrets, or intellectual property.

Data breaches have recently gained widespread attention as businesses of all sizes become increasingly reliant on digital data, cloud computing, and workforce mobility. With sensitive business data stored on local machines, on enterprise databases, and on cloud servers, breaching a company’s data has become as simple – or as complex – as gaining access to restricted networks.  In the last ten years alone, several large corporations have been hacked stealing the information of millions of customers and employees.  The larger companies that fall victim to a security are usually well know as they become a topic of discussions and concern because of the large databases of sensitive information that can quickly fall into the hands of an attacker after a breach occurs.  Most breaches are not as well know because the number of people affected is smaller.  However, even in the smaller breaches the company or organization has a legal responsibility to notify those affected.  Some of the largest data breaches over the last ten years are listed below.

  • Equifax: 143 million records compromised – almost half the country in 2017
  • Yahoo: 500 million records compromised in 2016
  • Myspace: 360 million records compromised in 2016
  • LinkedIn: 100 million records compromised in 2012 (reported in 2016)
  • Anthem: 80 million records compromised in 2015
  • JP Morgan Chase: 76 million records compromised in 2014
  • Home Depot: 56 million records compromised in 2014
  • Ebay: 145 million records compromised in 2014
  • Target: 70 million records compromised in 2013
  • Living Social: 50 million records compromised in 2013
  • Evernote: 50 million records compromised in 2013
  • Sony Online Entertainment: 24.6 million records compromised in 2011
  • Sony PlayStation Network: 77 million records compromised in 2010
  • Heartland: 130 million records in 2008
  • TK/TJ Maxx: 94 million records compromised in 2007